NSLU2

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tech

Index
1 Introduction
2 Installation
3 DNS/DHCP server
4 Installation of Apache
5 An NFS server
6 Installing a mailserver
7 Alternatives
8 Sane remote scanner
9 problems
\"cover\"

Previous: 6. Installing a mailserver Index Next: 8. Sane remote scanner

7. Alternatives

7.1. Unslung

One of my slugs will be used as an archive with big disks, preferrably more than 2. So I decided to try Unslung. So I downloaded the latest Unslung from http://www.slug-firmware.net/u-dls.php and put in the root of my webserver. Reboot & redboot:
while ! ping -W 1 -c 1 192.168.0.1 2>&1 >/dev/null; do true; done && telnet 192.168.0.1 9000
and flash:
ping -n 1 -h 192.168.0.55
load -r -b 0x01000000 -h 192.168.0.55 -m http /Unslung-6.10-beta.bin
fis write -f 0x50060000 -b 0x01060000 -l 0x7a0000
reset
DO NOT plug in any disks For some reason the slug turns up as 192.168.1.77, but gateway and DNS are correct. That's OK; we'll change that. At 192.168.1.77, you'll get a modified web-interface, where you can login as admin/admin. First set the network parameters. In that way, it won't interfere with my other slug-activities.

Now, apart from the nice Tux, nothing much changed compared to the original Linksys interface. So we'll first enable telnet. That is a non-obvious action. You need to simulate a web-client. See

http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/FAQ/EnableTelnetThroughTheWebInterface.
telnet 192.168.1.103 80
POST /Management/telnet.cgi HTTP/1.1
Host: 192.168.1.103
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
Content-Length: 20
Connection: Keep-Alive
Authorization: Basic YWRtaW46YWRtaW4=
action=Enable+Telnet

Don't forget the blank lines before and after the action-line. As an answer, you'll get a web-page. If not, add an extra blank line.

DO NOT plug in any disks That enables telnet. You can login as admin/admin, but the slug logs you out immediately. Look at http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/FAQ/CantTelnetToMyNewlyUnslungNSLU2. So, because we have not plugged-in any disks, we can login with root/uNSLUng. That does not lock us out.

Now, Unslung has a very unclear way of handling authentication. There are files all over the place. You'll find that, once you plugged in a disk, you suddenly cannot log-in anymore. If you plug in an extra disk, it often does not get recognized. Attaching via a HUB is also out of the question.

Behaviour of Unslung is unpredictable and it does not do more than the original NSLU2. So, although I got it working, I will remove it. It is just marginally better than the original Linksys firmware.

So that is the last you'll see of my unslung-adventure.

7.2. SlugOS

Another minimal slug replacement is slugOS. Download it from http://www.slug-firmware.net/, and put it in the root of your webserver. Telnet into redboot:
while ! ping -W 1 -c 1 192.168.0.1 2>&1 >/dev/null; do true; done && telnet 192.168.0.1 9000
and flash the stuff.
ping -n 1 -h 192.168.0.55
load -r -b 0x01000000 -h 192.168.0.55 -m http /slugosbe-4.8-beta-nslu2.bin
fis write -f 0x50060000 -b 0x01060000 -l 0x7a0000
reset
And the root-password is available from

http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/FAQ/OpenSlugDefaultPassword.

After login, you'll need to initialize a bit; First run turnup init and answer the dialog:
root@pheadrus:~$ turnup init
Please enter a new password for 'root'.
The password must be non-empty for ssh login to succeed!
Changing password for root
Enter the new password (minimum of 5, maximum of 8 characters)
Please use a combination of upper and lower case letters and numbers.
Enter new password:
Re-enter new password:
Password changed.
Host name [pheadrus]:
Domain name [home]:
Boot protocol (dhcp|static) [static]:
IP address [192.168.1.103]:
IP netmask [255.255.255.0]:
IP gateway [192.168.1.3]:
First DNS server [192.168.1.2]: 192.168.1.101
Second DNS server []: 192.168.1.2
Third DNS server []:
turnup init: you must reboot for the changes to take effect
 You may want to run 'turnup preserve' to save these settings,
 after making any additional configuration changes which you
 require.
The USB-stick was neatly recognized. Next, we want to put the root filesystem on the usb-stick:
turnup disk -i /dev/sda1 -t ext3 
/sbin/turnup: umounting any existing mount of /dev/mtdblock4
turnup: copying root file system
15213 blocks
done
turnup: initialising dev file system
turnup: ensuring /var/volatile mountpoint exists
turnup: ensuring tmpfs will not be mounted on /var
turnup: /etc/syslog.conf: changed to file buffering
 Old (buffer) version in /etc/syslog.conf.sav
 Log messages will be in /var/log/messages
root@pheadrus:~$  turnup preserve
And reboot.

After the reboot, I found everything in order. Even the big WD-elements disk was there:
root@pheadrus:~$ df
Filesystem           1k-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda1              3617116     75968   3357408   2% /
/dev/mtdblock4            6528      4952      1576  76% /initrd
/dev/sda1              3617116     75968   3357408   2% /dev/.static/dev
tmpfs                     2048        36      2012   2% /dev
/dev/sda2               122839      4146    117425   3% /media/sda2
/dev/sdb1            961432072 117935664 794658408  13% /media/sdb1
tmpfs                    15188         0     15188   0% /var/volatile
tmpfs                    15188         0     15188   0% /dev/shm

7.2.1. NFS server

Ok; let's install the NFS-server. First update the package-list and install the NFS-server:

ipkg update ipkg install nfs-utils

Now this installs the NFS-server. However, it does not create an nfs-exports-file. For me, creating an nfs-export is simple; I want all the media that I attach exported. So I added the following lines to /etc/init.d/nfsserver
for dir in `mount  | grep media | cut -d ' ' -f 3` ; do
        echo "$dir  *.home(sync,no_root_squash)"
done > /etc/exports
So next we'll stop/start nfs:
root@pheadrus:/$ cd /etc/init.d
root@pheadrus:/etc/init.d$ ./nfsserver stop
stopping statd: done
stopping mountd: done
stopping nfsd: done
removing nfsd kernel module: done
root@pheadrus:/etc/init.d$ ./portmap stop
Stopping portmap daemon: portmap.
root@pheadrus:/etc/init.d$ ./portmap start
Starting portmap daemon: portmap.
root@pheadrus:/etc/init.d$ ./nfsserver start
creating NFS state directory: done
starting 8 nfsd kernel threads: done
starting mountd: done
starting statd: done
root@pheadrus:/etc/init.d$
On the client-side, you may want to do some scripting as well. I use the following script to mount everything from phaedrus:
!/bin/bash
### Am I root?
if [ `id -u` -gt 0 ] ; then
        echo "You must be root"
        exit 1
fi
### Mount all exports from Phaedrus in a separate directory
/usr/sbin/showmount -e phaedrus |  grep -v xport|
while read exp perm ; do
        dir=${exp##*/}
        if [ ! -d /room/n20/$dir ] ; then
             mkdir /room/n20/$dir
        fi
        if mount | grep /room/n20/$dir  /dev/null ; then
             echo $dir already mounted.
        else
             mount phaedrus.home:$exp /room/n20/$dir
        fi
done
This needs some polishing ofcourse, but it's basic idea should be clear. In the end, it provides no extra advantages over a debian distribution. So I went back to debian.

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